Not Restlessness, But Rootedness

Tinney Concept, our exclusively online exhibition platform, is pleased to present the works of Kristine Potter, Rachel Boillot, and Molly Peters. Each of these Artists in Photography explore notions of existence and emotions with a particular emphasis on rootedness, or ties to home. In a climate exacerbating differences and disparities, there is an intrinsic fiber that connects people. It is a matter of circumstance, completely out of one’s control. It is one of the most fundamental notions of humanity… this common chord is a sense of home. It can be investigated through physical sense, emotional ties, and metaphorically throughout history. It is especially revered in the American cultural mentality i.e. the ‘American Dream.’ Altogether these series hint at the fragility of human existence, and how the places we call home will carry on with or without us. 

Prayer for Evelyn, Rachel Boillot

Prayer for Evelyn, Rachel Boillot

Rachel Boillot’s series “Moon Shine” explores the nearly untouched world of Appalachia within the Cumberland Plateau. Capturing the locale in a documentary-style lens, Boillot holds the ability to unassumingly capture the subject within their natural state. She brings to light the depth of rootedness embedded  within their traditions. These traditions are varied from musical, cooking, to storytelling; but altogether soulful and prayer-like.

Cumberland Mountain, Rachel Boillot

Cumberland Mountain, Rachel Boillot

Within Boillot’s piece Cumberland Mountain, the billowing fog cascades across the mountainside and hints at the ethereal through its own topographical means. The mountains encompass the communities and seem to act as a towering time capsule to hold onto the old-fashioned in a fast-paced world. Boillot’s work elevates humble surroundings, objects, and people into a sacred realm of appreciation for the precariously sustained world of deep-rooted folklore.

Wind on a Rock, Kristine Potter

Wind on a Rock, Kristine Potter

With their peaks and valleys, and altogether harsh terrain, mountains have their own unforgiving way to isolate their dwellers. This isolation causes there to be much mysticism and storytelling wrapped around the sparsely populated landscape. This environment peaked the curiosity of photographer Kristine Potter. She chose to spend three years between 2013-2015 investigating the myth of the ‘American Cowboy’. Within this span of time, she began to debunk aspects of the longstanding air of masculinity that surrounds the ‘American Cowboy’ standard.

Earth’s Cradle, Kristine Potter

Earth’s Cradle, Kristine Potter

Upon viewing her series “Manifest,” the ‘cowboys’ are portrayed in a more delicate lens, showcasing the vulnerability of the human body amidst the harshest of environments. Potter artfully creates compositions through capturing her subjects intertwined within the landscape. This imagery eludes to the wary balance of the human condition within the grasps of Mother Nature. It also provokes a sense of mortality; and strips down the individuals to their basic needs of existence. In viewing her work, one begins to ask his or herself: If stripped away from today’s distractions and luxuries, what would I deem most vital to my existence?

(Untitled) Slope, Molly Peter

(Untitled) Slope, Molly Peter

 Remote Islands are another topographical element that causes their dwellers to live at a tempo of their own accord. Molly Peters returned to the remote island of her adolescence after a large span of time away. Peters experienced a unique chord of existentialism returning to this familiar, yet different place. Simultaneously at her seven month return to home, Peters witnesses a close friend undergo a spiritual metamorphosis of dying and being reborn. This cyclical journey is catalogued throughout her series ‘Anima,’ Italian for soul. Peters’ ‘Anima’ is an allegory of life, death, and home being the final commonality amongst mankind.

The vast range exhibited between the works featured in Tinney Concept’s ‘Women in Photography’ causes a myriad of viewers to experience nostalgia and reflect about their own history and experiences of home. Instead of being resolute in disparities, remember the commonalities exhibited throughout mankind. To be rooted in one’s own identity and journey, as opposed to exhibiting the restlessness of the status quo.

(Untitled) Widowmaker, Molly Peters

(Untitled) Widowmaker, Molly Peters

Written By: Keisha Lambert