Between Intuition and Precision

A dive deeper inside Tinney Contemporary’s Women of Abstraction by Keisha Lambert

Left to Right: ‘Aftermath,’ Phouthavong, ‘Untitled’ and ‘ Suspirations of Order,’ Jarrett

Left to Right: ‘Aftermath,’ Phouthavong, ‘Untitled’ and ‘ Suspirations of Order,’ Jarrett

Tinney Contemporary broadens the conversation surrounding Abstract Expressionism with its current show entitled, “Women in Abstraction.” Abstract Expressionism is the first quintessential American Art movement that historically references and begins to catalogue women in the arts. Therefore it seems befitting to experience solely Abstract female artists in solidarity. Featuring abstracted works by Jeanie Gooden, Carol Mode, Sisavanh Phouthavong, Mildred Jarrett, Mary Long and Martica Griffin, Tinney Contemporary showcases the broad range within Abstract painting today. Together these women of abstraction, propel the conversation forward through modern works on paper, a mix of nontraditional framing, and intuitive exploration of the brush stroke. Each of these artists’ work exhibit precise, direct strokes along with more expressive intuitive mark-making. They are collectively standing on the line of what is quantifiable and what is only apparent through paint.


‘The Path Will Rise to Your Feet,’ Jeanie Gooden

Jeanie Gooden creates her body of work between the disparate cultures of Central Mexico and Tulsa, Oklahoma. Drawing from her myriad of personal experiences, Gooden takes a layering approach to creating her latest work ‘The Path Will Rise to Your Feet.’ She heeds the voice of her canvas and allows for the process to drive her body of work. Gooden allows space for the viewer to contemplate and derive their own meaning through reflection by range of materials in such immersive scale. The manipulation of nails, thread, and expressive mark making evokes a message that holds the ability to resonate on a more universal scale.

‘Outer Rims,’ Carol Mode

Carol Mode is a process-based abstract painter. She uses a systematic approach to problem-solving and allows space for alternate solutions as problems present themselves. Mode reaches for transcendence through emotive color and hand-drawn geometry in her work ‘Outer Rims.’

Mode has a visual optical language of her own, only distinguishable upon viewing her latest piece in person. She exhibits delicate shifts of color and mark-making within ‘Outer Rims’ that evokes a feeling of intimacy. 

Sisavanh Phouthavong’s ‘Aftermath’ opens the conversation, not only by use of non-traditional framing, but through the lens of an immigrant experiencing social injustice in their place of origin. Phouthavong artfully champions her voice of Political protest for the Legacies of War mission through her piece ‘Aftermath.’ She evokes this by her use of substantial scale, interrupted spaces-in-between, and bright impactful color. It is the perfect balance of rhythmic fragmentation of memory through realism and interrupting notes of vivid color juxtaposed against decay and destruction.  

‘Untitled’, 2019, Mildred Jarrett

Mildred Jarrett creates visceral work steered by long-nurtured intuition. In her latest abstract works, ‘Untitled’ and ‘Suspirations of Order’, Jarrett displays elegant movement of paint and composition. There is a intricate balance reached between soft emotive brushstrokes and harsh sgraffito scratching away of the paint. This combination attests to the energy Jarrett projects into each work. Jarrett’s works are a host of vibrancy and ferocity, but still leave space for the subdued moments of melancholia in between.

‘Bug Bam’, Mary Long

 Mary Long’s encaustic series on paper draws the viewer in. Long uses an archaic form of painting with beeswax yet brings it to a modern scape. The forms, laboriously applied through heat application of layers, appear to reference an abstracted view of a city scape. Layers of found materials and writings come in and out of the space. Some of the writing references American Law and Systems that Long has archived through wax. This half-hazard yet intentional archiving and crossing out delivers more intrigue as to the meaning behind Long’s work.

In a panoramic room at Tinney Contemporary, viewers can be enveloped by local artist, Martica Griffin’s work. The musical quality of Griffin’s work seems to parallel the times and culture surrounding her. The continuity of twisting bold lines paired with the lively choice of color suggests a graffiti influence in Griffin’s ‘Goddess’. The growth of Nashville influences Griffin’s work as it transitions from small-city to bustling urban environment. Griffin's bold use of color and vying layers of intentional and unintentional mark-making is reminiscent of Basquiat whose work was also born in a city influx with creative spirit.

‘Goddess’, Martica Griffin

The broad range of expression showcased in ‘‘Women of Abstraction’’ is a testament to female artists who paved the way for the current generation of artists to have the ability to share their voice. Come experience the prolific work of these Artists in person until September 28, 2019, and join the conversations surrounding that spans generations.

For more information regarding Sisavanh Phouthavong’s advocacy visit: http://legaciesofwar.org

From Street Art to Fine Art

‘Street Cred’ Opening, First Saturday Art Crawl, 2019

‘Street Cred’ Opening, First Saturday Art Crawl, 2019

 A look inside “Street Cred” by Keisha Lambert:

Tinney Contemporary’s latest exhibition, “Street Cred” featuring world-renowned street artists Blek De Rat, Mr. Brainwash, Seen, Risk as well as Nashville’s own Chris Zydek. ‘Street Cred’ is curated through a collaboration with Brian Greif, co-founder of the Nashville Walls Project. Curated with unification in mind, “Street Cred” features work from the original epicenters of graffiti. The ‘Golden Age’ of graffiti originated in the late 1970’s and early 1980’s. From the billboards, subways, and streets of Los Angeles to the sides of architecture in London gave rise to the ubiquitous Street Art movement. The underlying motif of each of these artists is to showcase the compelling relationship between humanity and the streets. 

 

Blek Le Rat’s ‘Fence Collaboration’ showcased during “Street Cred’’ at TInney Contemporary

Blek Le Rat’s ‘Fence Collaboration’ showcased during “Street Cred’’ at TInney Contemporary

Xavier Prou travelled from Paris to the streets of New York City and had his curiosity peaked by the ambiguous scribbles strewn across the buildings and subways. Prou questioned the origin and intent behind the marks. The initial motive of graffiti is held within the anti-authoritarian or counter-cultural drive. Upon returning to home, Prou knew that he wanted to leave his mark on the Parisian streets. Xavier Prou chose the tag name of Blek Le Rat inspired by a comic series ‘Blek Le Roc’. He viewed the term ‘Rat’ as an anagram for art. Rats also served as an icon of invasive species of Paris and metaphorically rooted in giving art back to the people of the city. Blek Le Rat also felt that in respect to the architecture, he would need more finesse in his application of paint. Speed and transport of paint was another important factor after Blek Le Rat faced a run-in with the authorities. Thinking back to his early memories, he recalled the spread of the Italian Fascist Propaganda through the stencil posters of Mussolini. This drew him to develop the detailed, painstaking process of paper-cutting and transporting of stencil graffiti. He is now given the moniker as the ‘Father of Stencil Graffiti.   His art became more emblazoned through a more political lens within society. It was the beginning of disenfranchised citizens expressing their dissatisfaction with society through graffiti—a view just as poignant today. Blek Le Rat also referenced historical elements within Art in his stencil graffiti such as Dali, Picasso, and Michelangelo. At a 30-year Retrospective of Blek Le Rat at the San Francisco MoMa, he tagged a fence post with an array of his stencil art graffiti. This piece is currently on view at Tinney Contemporary’s “Street Cred.” It is the quintessential unification piece of the show—containing countless tags of adornment from numerous graffiti artists across the globe. 

“R'“ for Risk, Risk

“R'“ for Risk, Risk

Closer to home in the 1980’s, Kelly Graval was in the Streets of Los Angeles, beginning his career as a graffiti artist. He started by finding spray cans inside his uncle’s garage and testing them on the street with the tag name of ‘Surf.’ This tag became too associated with his name because he always carried a surf board and spray cans inside of his car. He began to get too much ‘heat’ from the police and soon changed his tag to what is known today as ‘Risk.’ This was not only a label; it also reflected the style of his graffiti. He was known for ‘Going for the Heavens’ by tagging and painting extremely dangerous to reach billboards and overpasses. Risk began to get much notoriety early in his career from the highly attuned color play and artistry of his tags. If the thought, “I have seen this style before” crosses one’s mind; it is because in the mid-1980’s Risk published a cover on underground ‘Ghetto Art Magazine’ that distributed his how-to guide on graffiti lettering. This caused his style of graffiti to spread like wildfire. 

Risk has always been a multi-disciplinary artist and entrepreneur having started his own clothing company ‘Third Rail’ and serving as a set designer for Michael Jackson and the Rolling Stones.  ‘Street Cred’ features his well-known ‘Rolling Risky’ piece cultivated by the Rolling Stones emblem. Today, Risk operates his own gallery in LA championing local street artists within the city. He still features his own wide breadth of work containing canvases coated with car paint, neon lettering, and sculptural works that contain his ingrained California Surf and Car Culture motif. 

Pink Panther #2, SEEN

Pink Panther #2, SEEN

Across the coast in the 1970’s, Richard Mirando began infiltrating the New York City subways at the early age of twelve years old. The tag name that he identified his work with was ‘SEEN.’ This stemmed from the ubiquitous nature of graffiti itself. Across the streets of New York, Seen’s work came to providence with his bringing to life of imagery of comic book characters and super heroes. With the New York subway battle against graffiti coming to paramount in 1981, Seen began to paint his work on canvas. Due to Seen’s mastery of color and level of prestige in the Graffiti world, Seen’s work was shown alongside Keith Haring, Jean-Michel Basquiat, and Andy Warhol. 

 

Into the Nursery: Nativity, Zidek

Into the Nursery: Nativity, Zidek

Local artist Chris Zydek brought ideas of ancient geometry and harmony to the walls of Nashville in his meticulous approach to street art. Within the gallery walls, his work allowed the viewer to be able to appreciate his subtle shadows and precise mark-making. It evokes a thoughtful and meditative approach to the application of paint. Street Cred is available to see in person until August 23rd 2019 to experience the work of established local artists as well as Street Art legends in one space. 

Ashes to Snow (In Review)

‘ROSE/EROS’ (Triptych), Jane Braddock’s Studio

‘ROSE/EROS’ (Triptych), Jane Braddock’s Studio

A Look Inside ‘Ashes to Snow’ by Keisha Lambert

Tinney Contemporary is excited to share with you the latest works of Nashville artist Jane Braddock in her series titled ‘Ashes to Snow.’  Braddock has a multi-disciplinary history within the arts, starting as a Textile Designer and Colorist in New York City. The omnipresent grid within her work is well-established in her mind years before Braddock ‘picks up the brush’. Due to history within the textile arts, Braddock has always had a keen eye for color. This has also catalyzed her use of text as a pattern firstly, then slipping and sliding into carefully cultivated words and phrases.  In her latest body of work, there is a softer, feminine and poignant palette at hand. Tied within her mark-making and texture, is the act of controlled repetition alongside works freely poured beaming a more liberated feel. 

FirstBank First Saturday Art Crawl, May 2019

FirstBank First Saturday Art Crawl, May 2019

Once in front of Braddock’s work, one can truly appreciate the sheer scale of her work. It is an act of bravery to create at such scale.  Texturally, Braddock establishes a wide range of application techniques.  The combination of velvet layers of acrylic, application of metallic paint, and skillful adhesion of silver leaf develops a sense of devout anointing through paint from the artist. She uses both brush and her own thumbprints to apply paint. It gives her artistic process a ritualistic feel. Braddock’s work expertly absorbs and retracts the light that is given to it. The palette choice of ashen tones paired with the phrase “A Rose is a Rose is a Rose’ hints at the impermeability of life and the fragility of existence. It is a subtle play at a concept that Western society considers taboo. Braddock stares at it straight on with acceptance and tranquility. 

FirstBank First Saturday Art Crawl, May 2019

FirstBank First Saturday Art Crawl, May 2019

Wrapped inside and underneath Jane Braddock’s work is her self-submersion of cultures and philosophies. Known for her patterning of text and use of bold color, ‘Ashes to Snow’ her newest exhibition at Tinney Contemporary, shows a softer side. It beholds her mindful acts of inner contemplation and a culmination of years of meditative acts. The truth behind Braddock’s work does not reveal itself at one’s first glance. It is a message to those that take a breath, stand back, and allow their own thoughts to slip away. It is available as an act of listening and allowing ideas to permeate one’s psyche. Introspection and Inspection of her work goes hand in hand. To experience ‘Ashes to Snow’ and have Braddock’s work speak for itself, visit Tinney Contemporary until June 29, 2019.

Immersive Expressionism

A Review of Artists Jason Craighead & Arden Bendler-Browning by Keisha Lambert

Tinney Contemporary is excited to share with you the works of Jason Craighead and Arden Bendler-Browning in the simultaneous shows ‘Invisible Audience’ and ‘Places to Be.’ Each of these painters hone expressive mark-making and have an energy that draws the viewer in. Their marks exude liveliness and emotions that cannot be contained by words alone. Inspiration ranges from their past reflections, internal experiences, and the technological world. Craighead’s body of work seems to envelope not only himself but also how he exists in the space around him. Whereas Bendier-Browning’s work is an interpretation of how she exists through the space and time and the memories that arise as a result.

Detail of ‘Personal Perception’, Craighead 2019

‘Invisible Audience’ is the first body of work Craighead has produced since relocating to his Brooklyn-based studio. With this relocation from his long-time studio in North Carolina, Craighead began to question who it is that he creates for? The simple answer is himself. The more labyrinthine answer is the “Invisible Audience” that is humanity as a whole, present and future. 

Detail of ‘Beyond Time’, Craighead 2019

Once in front of Craighead’s work, the viewer is rewarded with a cacophony of naturally ambiguous mark-making laced within each piece. These marks are an account of Craighead allowing himself patience to let the work first speak to him and fuel his process. It is apparent in the intentionality behind his brushstrokes and the limitedness of his color palette. It is the act of listening, absorbing, and responding. These layered marks are full of energy and friction, fueled by emotion. 

Detail of ‘Within’, Craighead 2019

Detail of ‘Within’, Craighead 2019

 

Craighead’s exclusively limited choice of words such as ‘apparition,’ ‘perception,’ and ‘mirror’ heighten the notions of self-discovery within his work. Woven within his pieces on canvas and paper are drips and splashes of clear medium that add more to the dimension and intention in his work. These marks carry through them the actions alone of the artist and add a ghostly appeal. The path of discovery is also apparent in the parcels of poetry and words from books he chooses to imbed inside his work. These pages are broken and torn to hint that the path is never-ending. The process is eternal and cyclical, living beyond our time.


‘Turned Inside Out’, Bendler-Browning, 2019

Arden Bendler-Browning’s paintings of the series ‘Places to Be’ are a kaleidoscopic lens of modern life. Memories and landscapes are explored within her process by the use of Virtual Reality Painting. This is a cutting-edge capability inciting a broader range of exploration for artist Bendler-Browning. This technology allows the artist, along with the space around them, to be enveloped by the marks of their hands. Techniques of splashing and pouring seem to allow colors to float across the circular space of each painting. The continuity of each form, lets the viewer to be encompassed within the experience of her work.

Detail of ‘Turned Inside Out,’ Bendler-Browning, 2019

This immersive quality references how our memories of moments evolve and are an ever-changing blur of images and emotions. The paintings, themselves, seem to take place at the synapse of memory within the brain involving time and place.

Detail of ‘Black Mirror,’ Bendler-Browning, 2019

The range of qualities exhibited within her mark-making reference the growth of landscape painting. Journeying from the study of light from the Impressionists, to the boldness of the Expressionists, to a future place all her own intertwining the use of Modern Virtual Reality Painting.

The world moving before us and within us is hard to have a definite grasp on. At times, it can feel as if a sinking and sweltering swarm of emotions. A single moment or memory is fleeting even while we are experiencing it. Both ‘Invisible Audience,’ and ‘Places to Be,’ help to explore the psyche through a color or mark that showcases the interconnectedness of the human experience. How the places we have been define who we are little by little; and, how we ourselves get twisted and colored alongside of them. Be sure to experience these bodies of work for yourself available at Tinney Contemporary until April, 27, 2019.

Not Restlessness, But Rootedness

Tinney Concept, our exclusively online exhibition platform, is pleased to present the works of Kristine Potter, Rachel Boillot, and Molly Peters. Each of these Artists in Photography explore notions of existence and emotions with a particular emphasis on rootedness, or ties to home. In a climate exacerbating differences and disparities, there is an intrinsic fiber that connects people. It is a matter of circumstance, completely out of one’s control. It is one of the most fundamental notions of humanity… this common chord is a sense of home. It can be investigated through physical sense, emotional ties, and metaphorically throughout history. It is especially revered in the American cultural mentality i.e. the ‘American Dream.’ Altogether these series hint at the fragility of human existence, and how the places we call home will carry on with or without us. 

Prayer for Evelyn, Rachel Boillot

Prayer for Evelyn, Rachel Boillot

Rachel Boillot’s series “Moon Shine” explores the nearly untouched world of Appalachia within the Cumberland Plateau. Capturing the locale in a documentary-style lens, Boillot holds the ability to unassumingly capture the subject within their natural state. She brings to light the depth of rootedness embedded  within their traditions. These traditions are varied from musical, cooking, to storytelling; but altogether soulful and prayer-like.

Cumberland Mountain, Rachel Boillot

Cumberland Mountain, Rachel Boillot

Within Boillot’s piece Cumberland Mountain, the billowing fog cascades across the mountainside and hints at the ethereal through its own topographical means. The mountains encompass the communities and seem to act as a towering time capsule to hold onto the old-fashioned in a fast-paced world. Boillot’s work elevates humble surroundings, objects, and people into a sacred realm of appreciation for the precariously sustained world of deep-rooted folklore.

Wind on a Rock, Kristine Potter

Wind on a Rock, Kristine Potter

With their peaks and valleys, and altogether harsh terrain, mountains have their own unforgiving way to isolate their dwellers. This isolation causes there to be much mysticism and storytelling wrapped around the sparsely populated landscape. This environment peaked the curiosity of photographer Kristine Potter. She chose to spend three years between 2013-2015 investigating the myth of the ‘American Cowboy’. Within this span of time, she began to debunk aspects of the longstanding air of masculinity that surrounds the ‘American Cowboy’ standard.

Earth’s Cradle, Kristine Potter

Earth’s Cradle, Kristine Potter

Upon viewing her series “Manifest,” the ‘cowboys’ are portrayed in a more delicate lens, showcasing the vulnerability of the human body amidst the harshest of environments. Potter artfully creates compositions through capturing her subjects intertwined within the landscape. This imagery eludes to the wary balance of the human condition within the grasps of Mother Nature. It also provokes a sense of mortality; and strips down the individuals to their basic needs of existence. In viewing her work, one begins to ask his or herself: If stripped away from today’s distractions and luxuries, what would I deem most vital to my existence?

(Untitled) Slope, Molly Peter

(Untitled) Slope, Molly Peter

 Remote Islands are another topographical element that causes their dwellers to live at a tempo of their own accord. Molly Peters returned to the remote island of her adolescence after a large span of time away. Peters experienced a unique chord of existentialism returning to this familiar, yet different place. Simultaneously at her seven month return to home, Peters witnesses a close friend undergo a spiritual metamorphosis of dying and being reborn. This cyclical journey is catalogued throughout her series ‘Anima,’ Italian for soul. Peters’ ‘Anima’ is an allegory of life, death, and home being the final commonality amongst mankind.

The vast range exhibited between the works featured in Tinney Concept’s ‘Women in Photography’ causes a myriad of viewers to experience nostalgia and reflect about their own history and experiences of home. Instead of being resolute in disparities, remember the commonalities exhibited throughout mankind. To be rooted in one’s own identity and journey, as opposed to exhibiting the restlessness of the status quo.

(Untitled) Widowmaker, Molly Peters

(Untitled) Widowmaker, Molly Peters

Written By: Keisha Lambert

Carla Ciuffo: Portals within the Modern Era

A Look Inside Carla Ciuffo’s ‘Portals’ by Keisha Lambert

Carla Ciuffo’s latest show entitled “Portals: Immersive Contemporary Art” propels gallery-viewing into the 21st Century. Ciuffo has always been fascinated with the enigma of being human. In the modern age, to be human, is also to be intertwined with technology and media. Recently, electronic devices, such as phones, have begun to receive an unsavory perception regarding in-gallery use. Carla has partnered with the Artivive App and has regained control of the relationship between the gallery and technology. She pushes it further by encouraging the viewer to interact with her work using smart phones.

FirstBank First Saturday Art Crawl, Tinney Contemporary

Carla Ciuffo has been a photographic artist for nearly fifteen years. In this span of time, she has received numerous awards for her work that broadly ranges from non-narrative animated shorts, Nano-fiber work with Harvard University’s Applied Physics and Bioengineering group, to manipulation with augmented reality. Ciuffo uses this culmination of experience to make installation pieces that are not what initially meets the eye. Upon experiencing “Portals: Immersive Contemporary Art,” the viewer is pulled into Ciuffo’s envisioned dimension as if windows to a new world.

FirstBank First Saturday Art Crawl, Tinney Contemporary

FirstBank First Saturday Art Crawl, Tinney Contemporary

‘Portals’ rejects the traditional, static nature of photographs; and are full of life, energy, and motion. Carla Ciuffo’s work pushes the boundaries of what gallery viewing should be. The portals, themselves, have a hypnotic and transient quality about them. There is a cyclical balance between the promise of new life and seemingly inevitable destruction within Human-Environmental Interactions. It seems to showcase the victories and the woes of technological advancements through the portal with the viewer’s own lens. To experience this show and engage in this series, visit Tinney Contemporary Gallery until March 9th 2019.

FirstBank First Saturday Art Crawl, Tinney Contemporary

FirstBank First Saturday Art Crawl, Tinney Contemporary

Tinney Contemporary Highlighted by Global Travel Agency

tinneyfront.jpg

It is a great compliment when a leading global travel agency features us as a must see gallery in Nashville. In a recent blog post called: “72 Hours to Get Lost in Music, Culture, Food and Drinks in Nashville” the travel agency Flight Network mentioned Tinney Contemporary. This is what they said about our gallery in their blog post:

“We promised more than music, and also a look into the great culture and art scene in Nashville, and the best place to truly experience that is at Tinney Contemporary. There has been an artistic renaissance over the last decade in downtown Nashville, and this gallery is a testimony to that. On Fifth Avenue, this chic gallery space shares work from local and international talents, and the very best from both established and emerging contemporary artists. So whether you like photography, paintings, drawings or something else, you’ll thoroughly enjoy a visit to Tinney Contemporary Gallery. You will quickly realize that Nashville is a city packed with spectacular talents!”

Thank you, Flight Network, for these kind words, we are so proud to be a part of the Nashville art scene.